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Norfolk by design

PUBLISHED: 06:49 13 October 2014

Bring out in the best of your home with advice by Lanassir Lawes of Swank Interiors

Bring out in the best of your home with advice by Lanassir Lawes of Swank Interiors

Archant

Twenty years ago, when I first started working with fabrics, windows were often dressed with gathered blinds layered with heavy curtains and swags and tails, today we tend to use simple curtain headings.

Twenty years ago, when I first started working with fabrics, windows were often dressed with gathered blinds layered with heavy curtains and swags and tails, today we tend to use simple curtain headings such as double pleat or wave heading hung from a curtain pole or behind a stiffened pelmet. Dressing windows is very much like dressing ourselves – different shapes and sizes will suit different styles and getting the proportions right between ceiling height, pole size and pelmet depths is key and of course there are always ways to make windows appear taller and thinner when necessary! The style of window treatment will often depend on the type of room and whether the view or the window dressing is to be the focal point.

It is now 18 months since we started the major renovations of our own home and I am pleased to say that we are nearing completion. The curtains and blinds are being made while our furniture is coming out of storage and sofas being reupholstered and scatter cushions being added – the transition from planning to reality when you see the finished results is always an exciting time.

With a beamed house like ours the soft furnishings are one of the easiest ways to make a statement as low ceilings can often restrict feature lighting and wallpapering is down to personal taste. In our home we have used emulsion between the beams and wallpaper on all un-beamed walls such as chimney breasts and new partition walls.

My new dressing room that is being created in one of the former spare bedrooms now has all of the original beam work exposed and the ceiling has been removed leaving it fully vaulted. The starting point for the colour scheme is the curtain fabric, because the room is north facing with an uninspiring view towards our showroom I have chosen the vibrant ‘sun bird’ design by Matthew Williamson at Osborne and little to add colour. Wanting the overall feel of the dressing room is to be feminine but quirky ‘dip dye’ effect tassel fringing has been added to the leading edge of the interlined double pleat drapes.

On a smaller window such as our shower room roman blinds are a neat solution, they cut out minimal light but softens the window frame. Wider windows that have a short drop can be made to appear to have better proportions by adding a contrast trim down the edges or insert a band if there is a vertical join. For this blind I have added a bead trim to echo the precious stone design of the fabric again this was the starting point to the room and has inspired the faceted shower tray, basin and taps.

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